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Posts Tagged ‘broccoli’

[wolf whistle]

Quick! Somebody give me a prize for this broccoli!!

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Snow!

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Last winter i vowed to keep the garden going strong over this winter with cold frames and plastic hoop houses and over-wintering crops like purple sprouting broccoli.  With my exam and post-exam scramble to catch up on research, i have not made good on the cold frames and hoop houses (yet), but the broccoli, chard, rutabaga, and beets are going strong! I think dumping some not-quite-finished chicken poop compost on the broccoli bed (quick source of nitrogen) really helped the fall and winter broccoli get going- i don’t think anything has grown so big and green so quickly in our garden!

I had big plans for a winter kale garden too… but the kale seems to have entered sit-tight-and-wait-out-the-winter mode.  Half of the kale is planted near a black walnut tree, which, turns out, releases a chemical called juglone that inhibits the growth of other plants.  Solanums (tomato family) and brassicas (cabbage/broccoli/kale family) are particularly sensitive to this chemical, so that may be why these plants grew a foot tall and then… just… stopped.  The other half of the kale is planted in much better dirt, but i sowed them too late to allow them to grow big before the cold weather came in.  If i had taken the time to put up a plastic cover over them, they’d probably be pretty big by now, and we could pick leaves throughout the winter and the plants would come back to life in the spring.  Sigh… school keeps getting in the way of my garden!  I now have little plastic cloches over the small kale plants (liter soda pop bottles (from Smalls) and square baby salad green tubs (from Kate and Dave)), but i think it may be too cold for these to provide good protection.  Hopefully i can get my butt in gear and put a real hoop house over them before we leave for the holidays.

One thing that we have totally rocked at this fall/winter is collecting fallen leaves to cover the bare soil in the garden beds.  We raked up our leaves, the neighbors’ leaves, raided the park up the street after dark (mind you, it was only 8pm, but since it gets dark at 4:30, we felt real sneaky), and traded some eggs for several bins of leaves from our neighbor Jill who had already raked hers up.  I’d feel bad, but she has an electric leaf blower.  Now all of the bare garden beds that aren’t growing cover crop are buried under 4-6 inches of leaves, and the chard, beets, and kale have leaves stuffed all around them to protect the ground from freezing.  The leaves decompose slowly and provide food for earthworms and soil bacteria, etc, leaving the beds in much better shape than if they had been left bare under the rain all winter.  The difference is amazing- almost fluffy dirt vs. a packed down gravel bed with some soil underneath- i think that’s why the beets i planted in the spring (in an bed that had been left bare) are still waiting to grow big in November/December.

Also, the chickens looooove fallen leaves.  In total, i think we put 4 or 5 garbage bins full of leaves in their run.  They go nuts digging through them at first, then as the leaves settle down they provide a source of entertainment now that the chickens are not allowed on the lawn very often (it’s too wet nowadays and they destroy it faster than ever.)  I hear that worms and other bugs will make themselves at home in the leaves of the chicken run (until they get eaten), and the scratched up and pooped on leaves make great compost at the end of the winter.

Pictures and actual building of cold frames and hoop houses coming soon!

 

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